MEDICINE AND RESEARCH

http://www.healthline.com/health/multiple-sclerosis/facts-statistics-infographic
http://www.healthline.com/health/multiple-sclerosis/facts-statistics-infographic

ACP Repository –
One of ACP’s goals is to remove the bottlenecks that slow research into better understanding the causes and mechanisms of MS and related disorders. One area of focus includes providing researchers with the high-quality and well-annotated biospecimens they need to conduct their research, and then encouraging them to share those relevant study findings with the rest of the MS research community.

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Clinicaltrials.gov –
A service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health. ClinicalTrials.gov is a registry and results database of publicly and privately supported clinical studies of human participants conducted around the world. Learn more About Clinical Studies and About This Site, including relevant History, Policies, and Laws.

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The Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers –
1) CMSC INforMS: Pilot Study May Lead to Telemedicine Benefiting People with Multiple Sclerosis. Telemedicine, which allows healthcare professionals to evaluate, diagnose and treat patients at a distance with telecommunications technology, may soon benefit people with multiple sclerosis (MS).

Elizabeth Morrison-Banks, MD, a health sciences clinical professor at the University of California at Riverside School of Medicine, is planning a pilot one-year study of a home-based telemedicine program for MS patients.

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Story 2) CMSC INforMS: Researchers make major brain repair discovery in fight against Multiple Sclerosis. Queen’s University Belfast scientists have discovered that specific cells from the immune system are key players in brain repair — a fundamental breakthrough that could revolutionise the treatment of debilitating neurological disorders such as Multiple Sclerosis (MS).

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National MS Society –
The following U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved disease-modifying agents (.pdf brochure) reduce disease activity and disease progression for many people with relapsing forms of MS, including relapsing-remitting MS, as well as progressive forms of MS in those people who experience relapses. 

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system.[1][2] The disease typically presents between the ages of 20 and 40 and impacts approximately 35,000 individuals in the United States alone. [1][2] MS can lead to substantial disability with deficits seen in sensory, motor, autonomic, and neurocognitive function.[1] The greatest incidence of the disease tends to be at the extreme latitudes of the northern and southern hemispheres and has been more commonly seen in Western European ancestry.[2] In the general population, MS impacts approximately 60-200 per 100,000 people in North America and Northern Europe (high risk areas) and 6-20 per 100,000 people in low risk areas.[1]
http://pt851.wikidot.com/multiple-sclerosis-cell-bio. Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system.[1][2] The disease typically presents between the ages of 20 and 40 and impacts approximately 35,000 individuals in the United States alone. [1][2] MS can lead to substantial disability with deficits seen in sensory, motor, autonomic, and neurocognitive function.[1] The greatest incidence of the disease tends to be at the extreme latitudes of the northern and southern hemispheres and has been more commonly seen in Western European ancestry.[2] In the general population, MS impacts approximately 60-200 per 100,000 people in North America and Northern Europe (high risk areas) and 6-20 per 100,000 people in low risk areas.[1]
Other medications listed by the National MS Society that can help with relapses and specific MS symptoms such as depression, bladder control, fatigue and much more.

 

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From Drugs.com –
Compare drugs associated with Multiple Sclerosis
This site lists medications that are in some way related to, or used in the treatment of this condition. It has reviews, ratings, popularity or more for all of the common MS drugs.

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National MS Society –

Repairing Damaged Tissues-Decades of research into nerve physiology, MS tissue damage and the biology of glial cells – the numerous brain cells that support nerve cells – have laid the groundwork for finding ways to restore normal function in individuals with MS.

Nervous System Repair – Reversing Damage to Regain Function-Repairing the nervous system, in particular myelin, the coating that surrounds and protects axons (nerve wires) and which is damaged by MS, was just a dream just a few years ago. Today it holds significant promise as a strategy to restore the function that MS has taken from people; and reducing or stopping MS progression. This remarkable progress is due to the National MS Society’s comprehensive efforts and multi-million dollar research investments.
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Nature and Neuroscience –

Regulatory T cells promote myelin regeneration in the central nervous system-

Regeneration of CNS myelin involves differentiation of oligodendrocytes from oligodendrocyte progenitor cells. In multiple sclerosis, remyelination can fail despite abundant oligodendrocyte progenitor cells, suggesting impairment of oligodendrocyte differentiation. T cells infiltrate the CNS in multiple sclerosis, yet little is known about T cell functions in remyelination. We report that regulatory T cells (Treg) promote oligodendrocyte differentiation and (re)myelination.

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Medical News Today –
Novel immunotherapy reverses paralysis in mice. Multiple Researchers may be one step closer to developing new treatments for multiple sclerosis, after discovering a way to tame the erratic immune response that triggers the disease and reverse paralysis in mouse models of the disease.

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MS International Federation –
In this issue of MS in focus, our aim is to provide a comprehensive presentation of how scientifically valid research is conceptualised and carried out. We have attempted to answer questions such as why so many subjects are often required in a quantitative research study, why studies that do not involve humans are so important in the evolution of new therapies, and how other types of research using qualitative methods help to complete the picture of MS. These questions and more have been answered thanks to contributions from scientists from different parts of the world. We hope you will find this issue informative and that you find answers to your questions about research in MS.

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Science Daily –
Microrna treatment restores nerve insulation, limb function in mice with MS

Date:
March 27, 2017
Source:

http://multiple-sclerosis-wiki.wikispaces.com/History+Of+MS
http://multiple-sclerosis-wiki.wikispaces.com/History+Of+MS
Cincinnati Children’s Hospital Medical Center
Summary:
Scientists partially re-insulated ravaged nerves in mouse models of multiple sclerosis (MS) and restored limb mobility by treating the animals with a small non-coding RNA called a microRNA. In a new article, researchers report that treatment with a microRNA called miR-219 restarted production of a substance called myelin that is critical to normal function of the central nervous system.
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